Necrotect

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The Kings of Nehekhara were obsessed with death and the afterlife, and commissioned the creation of towering monuments to their glory and labyrinthine pyramids in which their mummified remains could be interred. The Necrotects were responsible for making their kings wishes a reality.

Role in Society

The Necrotects were artisans and architects of ancient Nehekhara. Each would design many awe inspiring monuments and then oversee their creation. Teams of slaves and workers would toil ceaselessly in the creation of War Statues, Monoliths, Tombs and Pyramids.

Necrotects were notoriously volatile, and it would take little to raise their ire. It was not uncommon for Necrotects to mete out harsh punishments for even the slightest delay or damage to their work.

They would never permit the finer details of a piece to be crafted by 'lesser' hands, and would often spend days carving intricate hieroglyphs and friezes. These were not simply ornamental, as the Necrotects were trained by the Mortuary Cult to ward the tombs and pyramids they crafted against the ravages of time and against malign influence that threatened the safety of the king's body.

In Death

No king wants his monuments shadowed by those of his successors or rivals, and as such the king's Necrotects would be interred within the pyramids of their own creation, to build the king's palaces in the afterlife and so that the secrets of their construction could never be revealed. Many went willingly, drinking of the poisoned cup offered to the Queen and Royal Guard, though some were reluctant and had to be encouraged, or suffer an 'accident' on a work site. Regardless, each were mummified and interred with all the tools of their trade, wearing a death mask, crafted by their own hand.

With the Tomb Kings marching to war once more, the skill of the Necrotects has been put to a new use. They march alongside the armies of Nehekhara, maintaining and repairing the colossal War statues that they built many centuries ago, ensuring that these deadly creations can continue in their duty to protect their Kings.

Ramhotep the Visionary

It is argued by many that the greatest Necrotect of all was Ramhotep, the Visionary of Quatar. He was responsible for designing the Grand Necropolis of Rasetra, the Monuments of Eternal Death in Zandri and the Monoliths of the Great Plains to name a few. However, he took no credit for these designs.

Because success as a necrotect would see him mummified, which Ramhotep saw as denying the world his gift, he would often disguise himself. He would join another Necrotect as apprentice, who he would then inflict with blood-lotus addiction. While they were consumed in a drug-addled stupor, Ramhotep would craft a death mask in their image, so perfect that no one would notice the difference. Ramhotep would then assume their identities and oversee the crafting of their great endeavors. Then, shortly before the project's completion, he would disappear and leave the confused Necrotect to take the credit for the work and the eventual mummification. Ramakat the Creative and Emrah the Artisan are just two of the many Necrotects to suffer such a fate. Eventually, Ramhotep's vision exceeded his mortal lifespan and after many decades of careful anonymity he removed his mask and agreed to build his final monument, that he claimed would rival the majesty of the Great Pyramid of Khemri. So it was that he created the great Sepulchre of the Heavens in Quatar. The king of Quatar was so pleased that he rewarded Ramhotep with an exquisite burial ceremony.

Upon awakening from death, Ramhotep was apoplectic with rage, having seen how few of his creations had survived unscathed over the centuries. He immediately set to work reviving his masterpieces, and continues to do so to this day, his skill and passion no longer constrained by simple mortality.

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