Venzor

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Venzor was a Soulblight vampire and lieutenant of the Mortarch of Sacrament [1]

Spoiler!
This page contains spoilers for: Neferata: Mortarch of Blood (novel)


Appearance

A tall thin vampire with a narrow skull, his skin pulled tight across it and with membranous wings – he was often clad in armour of midnight-blue. [1a]

History

In the Age of Sigmar he was dispatched by Arkhan to act as regent of the northern quarter of Nulahmia. He not only claimed a palace in his new domain but also took over a magnificent suite of chambers adjacent to the grand hall in the Palace of Seven Vultures atop the Throne Mount [1a] and successfully sought allies amongst the disaffected nobles of Neferata’s court including Dessina Avaranthe. [1a] [1c]

He was at first unaware of the approach of the great army of the Khorne Worshipper, Lord Ruhok as the Mortarch of Blood and her agents worked to keep him blind to the danger. When Neferata revealed the approaching enemy to him and the court, he was thrown off guard and never really regained his balance. [1b]

Although he bolstered his defences against the oncoming threat, he himself admitted when it arrived and began to assault the Hyena gate, part of his domain - that they were not ready. The situation became even direr when Neferata allowed a Bloodbound force through the Raven Gate, trapping him between two forces. [1d]

In desperation he fought Ruhok in single combat, but the two of them, along with their armies were devoured by the Maw of Uncreation when Neferata had the Annihilation Gate opened. [1e]

Quotes

She does, but only after a fashion. Her authority is diminished. After all, here I stand, deep in her beloved palace. By right of my master, granted to him by Nagash, I have unlimited access to the palace. Our forces do more than govern the walls and the northern sector of Nulahmia. We watch her actions in the heart of her domain. We watch, we see and we act.

~Venzor to Dessina Avaranthe.[1a]

Sources